Our story

"The story of Aalto Satellites begun in the year 2010..."

The story of Aalto Satellites started in the in year 2010, when a group of students started with a dream to build the first Finnish satellite. They gathered the best Finnish payload ideas, and made the first draft design of a 3U satellite around three of the payloads. The satelite become known later as Aalto-1. The payloads were provided by University of Helsinki, University of Turku, Finnish Metereological Institute and VTT. Building of the satellite started 2011. Launch agreement for the satellite was signed in 2015 and it was launched in 2017. The satellite become the first satellite of Finland in Finnish space object registry

 

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Astronaut Timothy Kopra was visiting his grandfather's native country Finland on the 9th of May in 2017. Kopra is the Aalto-1 satellite's idea's supporter and expert. The Aalto-1 team introduced Kopra the nearly ready Aalto-1 plans for the first time in the summer of 2010, The Aalto Satellites crew met him again in the Finnish Science Centre Heureke, where the Aalto-1 model got signed by him.

 

The team around Aalto-1 grew quickly and Aalto-2 satellite project was started already in 2012. With Aalto-2, Aalto University participated in the international QB50 mission, which consisted of dozens of nanosatellites in the Low Earth Orbit. Since Aalto-2 was part of a larger fleet of satellites, it was registered to Belgium for radio permit practicalities. The Aalto-2's main payload was Multi-Needle Langmuir Probe developed in the University of Oslo, which was intended to stude the properties of plasma.

 

A New Generation of Space Experts
 

Aalto student satellite program is currently part of Space Science and Technology major and  has educated tens of space scientists and technology experts. In 2012 our students started with a space SAR project which led to Iceye spin-off in 2015. Next year our students sinned-out with the next company, Reaktor Space Lab. In 2018, the small satellite team, led by Assistant professor Jaan Praks, become part of Finnish Centre of Excellence in Research of Sustainable Space and started development of Foresail missions.

Aalto space students work currently with Aalto-1 satellite operation, Suomi 100 satellite and Aalto-3 satellite. 

 

Page content by: | Last updated: 22.06.2018.